COMMON GOOD & CULTURE CARE

Eikon Collective values the place where being true to your beliefs intersects being open to other perspectives. Collaborations and conversations involving those who have different outlooks on life yet who share a similar desire to cultivate the world around them are always welcomed. Below is an excerpt from artist Makoto Fujimura addressing the heart of common good and culture care.


Culture Care is to provide care for our culture’s “soul” … Culture Care restores beauty as a seed of invigoration into the ecosystem of culture. Such soul care is generative: a well-nurtured culture becomes an environment in which people and creativity thrive. Culture Care ultimately results in a generative cultural environment: open to questions of meaning, reaching beyond mere survival, inspiring people to meaningful action, and leading toward wholeness and harmony. It produces thriving cross-generational community.

I want to begin to reclaim beauty, and to frame it for our time as a gift given to us by the Creator. I want to help recover a view of beauty as a gift that we discover, receive, and steward.

The framework of Culture Care rests on a number of foundational assumptions: The assumption that efforts to restore the cultural environment are good and noble, and that our efforts will benefit the next generation; the assumption that an attempt to speak with people through conversations and questions that are outside the current cultural and ideological divide is healthy and will ultimately help culture thrive.

As a Christian, I find the source and goal of beauty, of generative thinking, and of responsible action in the biblical understanding of what our lives are for. We find our creative identity in God. Genesis moments can be assumed simply because God is the great Artist, and we are God’s artists, called to steward the creation entrusted to our care. The good news of the Bible is that in Christ we are journeying toward ultimate wholeness, integration, and well-being. We are becoming more fully what we were made to be, to the benefit of all creation.

But Culture Care and generative principles are not concepts only for Christian believers or churches or religious conversations.

Culture Care is everyone’s business.

/ Makoto Fujimura /